2017 Diversity Conference

Department of Psychology and Culturally Aware Psychology Students (CAPS)
Present 8th Annual Diversity Conference
Friday, April 28 & Saturday, April 29
Unapologetically Diverse, Positively Unique

REGISTER NOW

 

Conference Schedule at a Glance 

Day Time Session/Topic   Location Speaker
CE Hours/Credits

Friday,
April 28
5:30-6:30 p.m.


Registration

  Evans Hall Lobby    
6:30-8 p.m. Racial Healing: Interacting Effectively with Melanics   Ginsburg Amphitheater  Ayo Maria Gooden, PhD, ABPBC, LLC  1.5
             
             
Saturday,
April 29
8-9 a.m. Continental Breakfast and Registration

  Evans Hall Lobby    
9-10:30 a.m. Opening Plenary 
Working with Diverse Communities: Basic Immigration Law and Developing Cultural Competence in Communicating with Immigrant Populations

  Ginsburg Amphitheater  Krishma C.P. Mastroianni, Esq.  1.5 
10:45 a.m. - 12:15 p.m. Schools Supporting Sexual Minority Youth: Implications for Practice   Zedeck Amphitheater  Michael Appelgren, PsyD, NCSP, ABSNP
1.5
12:15 - 1 p.m. Lunch
Lunch will be on your own – please feel free to bring your own bagged lunch. A list of restaurants and delis in the area will be provided to all participants.

   
 

 
1 - 2:30 p.m.  Closing Session
School Psychology, Social Justice, and Equitable Practice
  Ginsburg Amphitheater  Charles Barrett, PhD 1.5

 

Program Details

 

Friday, April 28, 6:30-8 p.m.
Ayo Maria Gooden, PhD, ABPBC, LLC
Racial Healing: Interacting Effectively with Melanics

Racial Healing: Interacting Effectively with Melanics examines racial biases of Caucasians, Blacks and other Melanics (a term coined by Dr. Ayo Gooden to more accurately refer to People of Color) and how racial biases impact relationships between Caucasians and Melanics, as well as, among Melanics. Life issues impacting inter-racial relationships and bi-racial children/adults are examined. The effects of racial biases on academics, mental and physical health will be examined. An examination of institutional systems that reinforce racial biases and ways to counter racial biases are presented. Strategies to initiate racial healing and to empower employees, employers, teachers/professors, students, parents, staff, administrators, health care workers, and the general public to stop racial violence and to contribute to the creation of a pluralistic society will be explored. The presenter will use the clinical and empirical literature as well as practice knowledge in this area to inform guidelines for best practice.

Educational Objectives:

Based on the presentation, the participants will be able to:

  • Describe racism, implicit bias, racial scripts, cultural encapsulation, cultural competence, Maafa, mentacide, “Post traumatic Slave Syndrome”, and violence.
  • List contributions by Blacks and other Melanics to world civilizations
  • Explain why many Melanics may experience low self-esteem and list ways to build healthy self-esteem.
  • Describe ways racism shapes Melanic and Caucasian thoughts, beliefs and behaviors
  • Discuss strategies to counter feelings of superiority and/or inferiority that contribute to racism, violence, poor grades, inadequate work performance, poor relationships, and unhealthy life choices.

About the Speaker:

Ayo Maria Gooden, Ph.D., ABPBC, LLC. is a Licensed Psychologist, Board Certified African Centered/Black Psychologist, Diplomate and Fellow in full-time private practice in West Chester, PA. President/CEO of Ma’at Institute. Dr. Gooden specializes in multi-cultural/bi-racial issues and works with all ethnic groups using cognitive behavioral therapy with individuals, couples and families (children, teens, adults). She is a consultant, public speaker and a Lincoln University graduate. Dr. Ayo is the first in her family to earn a college degree. In 2008, she was honored as one of 33 Blacks to ever earn a Ph.D. in psychology from the University of Cincinnati since 1819. She earned her MA and Ph.D. in clinical psychology and is a former university professor and administrator. She is a host on the WCHE 1520AM radio talk show, Don’t Get It Twisted, Thursdays from 1pm until 2 pm. She is past President of the Delaware Valley Association of Black Psychologists and the Co-Founder/First President of the Kentuckiana Chapter of Black Psychologists.

Target Audience: Doctoral Level Psychologists and Other Mental Health Professionals 
Level of Instruction: Basic 
Location: Ginsburg Amphitheater
CE hours/credits: 1.5

[Conference Schedule]

 


Saturday, April 29, 9-10:30 a.m. - Opening Plenary
Krishma C.P. Mastroianni, Esq. 
Working with Diverse Communities: Basic Immigration Law and Developing Cultural Competence in Communicating with Immigrant Populations

This presentation will focus on the basics of how immigration agencies in the United States are structured, the different types of immigration statuses and how immigrants can obtain lawful status in the United States (such as citizenship and residency). The presentation will also address issues of contemporary immigration policies and how they are affecting immigrant communities. Finally, the presenter will discuss how to best communicate with immigrant populations, taking into consideration heightened anxieties and past traumas that individuals may have faced before entering the United States. The presenter will use the clinical and empirical literature as well as practice knowledge in this area to inform guidelines for best practice.

Educational Objectives:

Based on the presentation, the participants will be able to:

  • Explain immigration statuses and relief from deportation.
  • Describe the appropriate level of communication necessary regarding a patient’s immigration status.
  • Explain how to appropriately refer a patient to an immigration attorney for assistance.
  • Discuss professional skills in communicating with immigrant populations, taking into account environmental stress factors specific to the immigration context.

About the Speaker:

Krishma C.P. Mastroianni is a Supervisory Attorney with the U.S. Department of Justice, Executive Office for Immigration Review, Board of Immigration Appeals. In this capacity, she supervises a team of Attorney Advisors tasked with drafting appellate decisions addressing the appeal of immigration court cases from across the country. Prior to working for the government, Krishma was the Senior Staff Attorney for the American Bar Association’s Immigration Justice Project in San Diego, CA. There, she served as appointed counsel for detained immigrants with severe mental disabilities and facilitated the Legal Orientation Program (LOP). Previously, Krishma worked for the Rocky Mountain Immigrant Advocacy Network, in Denver, Colorado, as a Staff Attorney, serving vulnerable populations of immigrants. She represented both children and adults in affirmative and defensive immigration proceedings and also facilitated the LOP. Throughout her career, Krishma has provided mentorship and training to pro bono attorneys, experienced immigration attorneys, and other professionals, regarding various aspects of immigration litigation including basic immigration court procedure and how to work with and effectively represent mentally disabled individuals. Krishma earned her JD from the University of Denver, Sturm College of Law and dual BAs from Lewis & Clark College in International Affairs and Hispanic Studies. She is licensed to practice in California. Krishma speaks Spanish, Chinese and Hindi.

Target Audience: Doctoral Level Psychologists and Other Mental Health Professionals
Level of Instruction: Basic
Location: Ginsburg Amphitheater
CE hours/credits: 1.5

[Conference Schedule]

 


Saturday, April 29, 10:45 a.m.-12:15pm
Michael Appelgren, PsyD, NCSP, ABSNP
Schools Supporting Sexual Minority Youth: Implications for Practice

The purpose of the presentation is to provide school psychologists/mental health professionals with knowledge of specific interventions and resources in order to support sexual minority youth, more specifically transgender students. The presentation will provide necessary terminology associated with sexual minority youth. The “coming out” process, and the myriad of risks and challenges associated when self-disclosing, will be discussed. Additionally, this presentation will provide information on support systems identified in the literature for school psychologists and mental health professionals when working with students who identify as sexual minority youth. The presenter will use the clinical and empirical literature as well as practice knowledge in this area to inform guidelines for best practice.

Educational Objectives:

Based on the presentation, the participants will be able to:

  • Describe appropriate terminology when working with sexual minority youth.
  • Explain the “coming out” process, and the risks and challenges associated with self-disclosure.
  • Describe legal and ethical standards of confidentiality when working with LGBT youth
  • Discuss resources and interventions for professionals to use in order to support sexual minority youth.

About the Speaker:

Dr. Appelgren is currently a school psychologist in Millburn Township Public Schools in New Jersey. He is also an adjunct instructor for the psychology graduate program at Seton Hall University. Dr. Appelgren earned his BA (2006), MA (2008), and Ed.S. (2010) from Seton Hall University. He then went on to pursue his Doctorate in Psychology (Psy.D.) from PCOM (2015). Dr. Appelgren is a Nationally Certified School Psychologist (NCSP), and holds a Diplomate from the American Board of School Neuropsychology. He has experience working with students Pre-K to 12th grade in urban and suburban areas. He completed his pre-doctoral internship with the NJ Juvenile Justice Commission providing mental health counseling, psychological assessments, fire setting risk assessments, and program recommendations. His research interest includes the “coming out” process and supporting sexual minority youth.

Target Audience: Doctoral Level Psychologists and Other Mental Health Professionals 
Level of Instruction: Intermediate
Location: Zedeck Amphitheater
CE hours/credits: 1.5

[Conference Schedule]

 


Closing Session: 1 p.m.-2:30 p.m.
Charles Barrett, PhD
School Psychology, Social Justice, and Equitable Practice

 

The equitable practice of school psychology necessarily includes professionals’ abilities to challenge systems, policies, and procedures that are ineffective to meet the needs of students, especially those who have historically been marginalized by various demographic factors. Using data from national organizations, federal agencies, and clinical practice, this presentation will challenge attendees to think critically about their current professional practice and identify areas for continued professional growth. Through the lens of social justice, implications for research and practice will be shared with an emphasis on best practices for identifying students with a variety of disabling conditions. The presenter will use the clinical and empirical literature as well as practice knowledge in this area to inform guidelines for best practice.

Educational Objectives:

Based on the presentation, the participants will be able to:

  • Discuss the role of social justice in psychologists and other mental health professionals in promoting and developing equitable clinical practice
  • Critique a variety of factors that need to be considered when making educational and clinical decisions for diverse students
  • Demonstrate an awareness of the subjectivity of standardized data
  • Discuss current professional practice through a social justice framework

About the Speaker:

Charles Barrett graduated from St. John’s University with a Bachelor of Arts degree in Psychology and English. He later earned a Master of Education in Human Development and a Doctor of Philosophy in School Psychology from Lehigh University. His dissertation, The Cross-Cultural Assessment of Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder: Influence of Acculturation and Socioeconomic Status on Maternal Ratings, is a demonstration of his interest in developing an understanding of the factors that contribute to the misidentification and overrepresentation of culturally diverse students with various disorders and disabilities.

Charles has presented at national conferences and has been featured in publications sponsored by state and national associations. Additionally, he serves in various leadership capacities within the National Association of School Psychologists (NASP) including the Publications Committee (member), co-chair of the Bilingual Interest Group, and co-chair of the Social Justice Task Force. Since July 2008, Charles has been employed as a school psychologist with Loudoun County Public Schools where he serves as an internship supervisor and chairs the APA-accredited training program’s Committee on Diversity. Committed to the training and development of future school psychologists, Charles is an adjunct lecturer in the Graduate School of Education at Howard University.

Target Audience: Doctoral Level Psychologists and Other Mental Health Professionals 
Level of Instruction: Intermediate
Location: Ginsburg Amphitheater
CE hours/credits: 1.5

[Conference Schedule] 


 

Registration

The Diversity Conference is free of charge, but advance registration is required. To register, please visit: www.surveymonkey.com/r/PCOMDiversity2017.

Parking

PCOM has a parking garage that can be entered from the PCOM driveway off Monument Road, from Stout Road, or from City Avenue.  Cost: $5 (cash and/or credit card is accepted).

Parking will be available for free in the PCOM Monument Lot, on Monument Road between Target and Fresh Grocer on SATURDAY ONLY.  

Readings

A brief list of readings for each presentation will be distributed to participants on the day of the event.

 

Continuing Education Credits

 
Criteria for Earning CE

For those attending, you must sign into each session, attend each session in its entirety and complete and submit the evaluation form at the conclusion of each session to be awarded the Continuing Education credit designated for each session. Partial credits for any given session are not available.

Psychologists: 1.5 CE hours/credits per event. The Philadelphia College of Osteopathic Medicine (PCOM) Department of Psychology is approved by the American Psychological Association to sponsor continuing education for psychologists. PCOM Department of Psychology maintains responsibility for this program and its content.

NBCC Counselors: 1.5 CE hours/credits per event. Philadelphia College of Osteopathic Medicine, Department of Psychology, is an NBCC-Approved Continuing Education Provider (ACEP) and may offer NBCC-approved clock hours for events that meet NBCC requirements. The ACEP solely is responsible for all aspects of the program. We adhere to NBCC Continuing Education Guidelines (PROVIDER #5672).

Licensed Social Workers: 1.5 hours/credits per event. The Philadelphia College of Osteopathic Medicine (PCOM) Department of Psychology is approved by the American Psychological Association to sponsor continuing education for psychologists. The PCOM Department of Psychology maintains responsibility for this program and its content. The Pennsylvania Board of Social Work Examiners recognizes and accepts the psychology continuing education hours/credits for social workers. Social workers who meet the CE criteria will receive the Certificate of Attendance.


Director of Continuing Education
Robert A. DiTomasso, PhD, ABPP

Associate Director of Continuing Education
Bruce S. Zahn, EdD, ABPP

Continuing Education Student Advisory Committee
Rachel Gerofsky, Sarah Decker, and Steven Hofberg

Coordinator for Continuing Education
Rachel J. Cuffeld-Gaymon, MBA

Unless otherwise specified in the program promotional materials, there is no commercial support interest to the sponsor, instructors, content of instruction or any other relationship that could be construed as a conflict of interest. Unless otherwise noted in the promotional materials, all PCOM Department of Psychology CE programs are free of charge. For any program for which a fee is charged, there is a Refund/Cancellation Policy.

Refund/Cancellation Policy:

For any program that has a fee attached, the Department of Psychology requires that notification of cancellation be made no later than 3 business days before the day of the program. Full refunds are available for notifications for programs with fees that are made within 3 business days prior to the day of the event. For all other cancellations, a credit will be issued for a future PCOM CE program.

Further Information about the Refund/Cancellation Policy and any other questions may be obtained by contacting Rachel Cuffeld-Gaymon, MBA, Coordinator of Continuing Education, at 215-871-6533 or Rachelcu@pcom.edu.