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2012 Annual Diversity Conference

(Past Conference)

Philadelphia College of Osteopathic Medicine
Department of Psychology
&
Culturally Aware Psychology Students (CAPS)

Presented:

Mind and Body Integration: Cultural Implications
3rd Annual Diversity Conference

Friday, March 30, 2012 from 6-8pm
&
Saturday, March 31, 2012 from 8am-3pm

Free and open to all students, faculty, professionals, and the general public with registration.

 

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Conference Schedule

Keynote Speaker:

George Gardiner, MD
Distinguished Life Fellow, American Psychiatric Association
Friday, March 30, 6:00 – 8:00 PM
Ginsburg Auditorium


Special Presentations:

From Homeless to Lawyer to Advocacy of the Culturally Disempowered
Nikki Johnson-Huston, JD/MBA/LL.M in Taxation
Saturday, March 31, 9:00 - 10:30 AM

Doing No Harm: Understanding the Sociocultural Determinants Which Influence Quality of Care and Client Outcomes
Charles “Chuck” Williams, PhD
Saturday, March 31, 2:00 - 3:30 PM


Workshop Sessions:

Veterans' Use of Religion/Spirituality as Culturally Relevant Coping Skills for Trauma and Recovery

Sean Lincoln, PhD
Saturday, March 31, 10:30 - 11:30 AM

Trauma-Focused CBT and Latino Youth: A Developing Perspective
Arturo Zinny, MA, LPC (2012)
Saturday, March 31, 10:30 - 11:30 AM

Cross-Cultural Considerations for Mental Health Assessments
Delane Casiano, MD
Saturday, March 31, 10:30 - 11:30 AM

Dueling Identities and Double Jeopardy: My Culture vs. My Life
Javier Dominguez, D.P.M., MS
Saturday, March 31, 11:40 AM - 12:40 PM

Clyde’s Daughter: A Journey through Stigmatization and Serious Mental Illness in the African American Family
DeBorah Gilbert White, PhD
Saturday, March 31, 11:40 AM - 12:40 PM

A Deaf School Psychologist Signs Out: Reflections/Insights on 30 Years of Working in the Trenches of Deaf Education
Michael Ralph, MA, CAGS, NCSP
Saturday, March 31, 11:40 AM - 12:40 PM

Intimate Partner Violence Intervention through the Lens of Culture
Caroline Campbell, LSW & Zujeil Flores, BA
Saturday, March 31, 10:30 AM - 12:30 PM

Standing Up and Speaking Out Against Hate Crimes
Cliff Akiyama, MA, MPH, CGS, CGP
Saturday, March 31, 10:30 AM - 12:30 PM


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Mind-Body Dualism or Mind-Body Duels?
George C. Gardiner, MD, DLFAPA
Distinguished Life Fellow, American Psychiatric Association
Adjunct Associate Professor, Psychiatry – Drexel University College of Medicine
Physician Advisor, Community Behavioral Health

Biographical Sketch: Dr. Gardiner graduated from Bates College with a BS degree and from Tufts University School of Medicine completing a straight medicine internship at Boston City Hospital. He later completed training in Internal Medicine and Pulmonary Diseases at the Philadelphia Veterans Administration Hospital. Subsequently, Dr. Gardiner finished his residency in Basic Psychiatry at Hahnemann University.

Dr. Gardiner’s professional experiences range from community/public health to academic administration.  Dr. Gardiner has served as Director of Personal Health Services at the Southeastern Philadelphia Neighborhood Health Center where he initiated comprehensive health programs funded by the federal Office of Economic Opportunity.  Later in his career, Dr. Gardiner became the Regional Health Administrator for the United States Department of Health, Education, and Welfare in Philadelphia. Expanding his professional repertoire, Dr. Gardiner served as Associate Provost for Minority Affairs of MCP Hahnemann University and Associate Dean, Minority Affairs in the School of Medicine.

Following training in Psychiatry at Hahnemann, Dr. Gardiner stayed in several different positions, including the founding director of the Psychiatric Medical Care Unit, an innovative inpatient facility caring for patients with combined medical and psychiatric illness. At Community Behavioral Health, Dr. Gardiner serves as an Adult Psychiatrist working with the staff in the authorization of mental health and substance abuse services for Medicaid recipients in Philadelphia. Currently, he is the Physician Advisor.

Dr. Gardiner is board-certified in Internal Medicine and Psychiatry.  He is also a Distinguished Life Fellow of the American Psychiatric Association.

Description of presentation: For many ethnic and cultural groups, the mind and the body are viewed as separate entities.  This belief has both stymied and stigmatized those who present a different orientation, leading to drastic consequences.  In order to address the needs of both groups and the implications of the varying opinions, critical consciousness must be rendered. Reviewing some aspects of the history of separating the mind from the body and then a rapprochement, Dr. Gardiner will explore the implications for health and healthcare practices in different cultural settings.

Educational Objectives:

  1. Describe the application of the Bio-Psycho-Social model in understanding cross-cultural issues in behavioral health
  2. Describe the mechanisms involved whereby psychosocial stressors can involve physical and emotional disruptions.
  3. List common therapeutic interventions that can bridge the “mind-body” chasm.

Target Audience: Doctoral Level Psychologists and Other Mental Health Professionals

Level of Instruction: Intermediate

CEU: 2 Credits

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From Homeless to Lawyer to Advocacy of the Culturally Disempowered
Nikki Johnson-Huston, JD/MBA/LL.M in Taxation
Assistant City Solicitor
City of Philadelphia Law Department

Biographical Sketch: Nikki is an unlikely success story. Born into poverty, she was homeless at age 9, failed out of college by age 18, and by age 30, a law school graduate with a law degree, M.B.A. and LL.M in Taxation all earned at the same time in only 4 years.  Nikki is also a successful award-winning young tax attorney and a frequent speaker about how she overcame a life of poverty and homelessness to achieve her dreams.  She will share her very personal story of how she got her life back on track, fought through adversity and never gave up on her dreams no matter the odds.

She is a member of the Board of Governors of the Philadelphia Board of Governors and the former Co-Chair of the Philadelphia Bar Association Women in the Profession Committee. Throughout her professional tenure, Nikki has served as a member of several boards of directors, and started a mentoring program for inner-city students interested in pursuing a career in the legal profession. Nikki has conducted numerous panels about issues related to education and co-moderated an event with Bill Cosby in November 2008 about her experience growing up in poverty.  In addition, she has won several awards including the Craig M. Perry Community Service Award given by the Philadelphia Bar Association Young Lawyers Division, been named a 2009 “Lawyer on the Fast Track” by the Legal Intelligencer, one of the “10 People under 40 to Watch in 2010” by The Philadelphia Tribune, a 2010 Woman of Distinction by The Philadelphia Business Journal, 2011 Next Generation: Rising Star, and a 2012 Eisenhower Fellow where she will be traveling to India to work with the homeless and children living in poverty. Nikki is also a former host on the Comcast Channel 53 show, “A Life in the Law: Legal Leaders.”

Description of presentation: The homeless rate in the United States currently stands at 11% and over 46 million Americans are under/uninsured. This discussion will explore the journey and life of Nikki Johnson-Huston from homelessness to successful lawyer to advocate.  Ms. Huston speaks about her experiences in poverty as a way to empower others to break the cycle of generational poverty and homelessness. She wants to help the disadvantaged to live a better life and to give a voice to the powerless. In doing so, Mr. Huston believes that anyone can be an effective advocate, but that those who provide professional service such as health practitioners have a special duty to be respectful and culturally aware. According to Ms. Huston, “Life is about ordinary people doing extraordinary things and that is how change happens.”

Educational Objectives:

  1. Learn the role advocacy plays in the treatment of culturally-diverse patients/clients 
  2. Gain an understanding of providing total care to a patient/client which includes treating the individual’s family and mental issues
  3. Understand the challenges in providing services to underinsured, uninsured, and those living in poverty

Target Audience: Doctoral Level Psychologists and Mental Health & Health Professionals

Level of Instruction:  Intermediate

CEU: 1.5 Credits

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Doing No Harm: Understanding the Sociocultural Determinants which Influence Quality of Care and Client Outcomes
Charles A. Williams III, PhD

Biographical Sketch: Charles A. Williams III, PhD, aka “Dr. Chuck” is an educational psychologist and full-time member of the faculty in the School of Education in the Goodwin College at Drexel University. He also serves as director of their Center for the Prevention of School-Aged Violence.  His work focuses on mentoring, bullying, the achievement of minority and special needs youth, and child welfare. His book contribution, "The sociocultural factors affecting minority student achievement in the US," is to be published in a forthcoming book on education and social justice.  His article, "Mentoring and social skills training: ensuring better outcomes for youth in foster care" has been featured in the journal Child Welfare.  He was recently invited by the White House to serve as a plenary speaker for the White House Conference on Faith-based and Neighborhood Partnerships.  He has been appointed by Philadelphia Mayor Michael Nutter to the Community Oversight Board for the Department of Human Services (DHS).  In 2011, he received the National Adoption Center’s prestigious Alison Award for his commitment to child welfare reform.  He is also no stranger to the media.  In fact, he is the former co-host of The Grimaldi & Williams Show, which was heard weeknights on CBS Radio in Philadelphia.  He is frequently called upon by national media outlets such as Fox News, CNN, MSNBC, truTV, the Associated Press, Wall Street Journal, USA Today, and the Christian Science Monitor.  Dr. Chuck, as he has come to be known - also a former foster youth - has been able to accomplish such extraordinary things given that he has held on to his faith and one sacred tenet: "the way you start does not have to be the way you finish."

Description of presentation: Participants will explore and discuss the impact of the critical social, interpersonal and cultural variables which influence the work of professional helpers. This would include exploring such issues as cultural awareness, trust and relationship building, inclusionary practice, the culture of expectations, and the role of self-disclosure.

Educational Objectives:

  1. Participants will be able to identify areas for personal growth and improvement 
  2. Participants will be able to support personal growth and improvement for students, colleagues and organizations 
  3. Participants will be able to develop an effective and helping alliance with various client populations

Target Audience: Doctoral Level Psychologists, Mental Health & Health Professionals, Social Workers, and Counselors

Level of Instruction: Intermediate

CEU: 1.5 Credits

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Veterans' Use of Religion/Spirituality as Culturally Relevant Coping Skills for Trauma and Recovery
Sean Lincoln, PhD

Biographical Sketch: Sean Kathleen Lincoln, PhD is an experienced organizational administrator with skills and expertise in diversity, work/life initiatives, training and career counseling, clinical psychology, behavioral health, systems design and administration.  Experience was gained in the health care and banking industries. She holds a doctoral degree in clinical psychology from Boston University.

Dr. Lincoln currently is a clinical psychologist at the Philadelphia Veterans Administration Medical Center providing disability assessments.  Previously, Dr. Lincoln served as the Director of the Office for Diversity at the Philadelphia Bar Association.  In this role, she provided support to legal firms and organizations, as well as developed and implemented programming to enhance diversity. 

Beginning in 1998, Dr Lincoln served the Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia as Diversity and Work/Life Initiatives Administrator.  Dr. Lincoln designed and implemented diversity related programs for all levels of organizational management assisting in creating awareness and an understanding of cultural differences and the related impact on work effectiveness.  As work/life initiatives administrator, Dr. Lincoln implemented programs to enhance the lives of employees.  The above components contributed to the Hospital being awarded the Healthy Workplace Award by the Pennsylvania Psychological Association in 2000, the Commitment to Diversity Award from the Greater Valley Forge Human Resources Association in 2003 and contributed to the Hospital receiving the Best Places to Work in Philadelphia Award in 2003.

Prior to this, Dr. Lincoln has served in a variety of capacities within the health and mental health fields including Director or Outpatient Services and Professional Services Group at the Philadelphia Child Guidance Center and Director of Mental and Social Health at the Roxbury Comprehensive Community Health Center in Roxbury, Massachusetts.  In the banking industry, Dr. Lincoln held positions with successive personnel, fiscal and administrative responsibilities. 
In addition to being licensed in the commonwealth of Pennsylvania, Dr. Lincoln holds certificates in Diversity Management for HR Executives from the Society for Human Resource Management and in Leadership Development Training from Personnel Decisions International. She has facilitated expert panels with the federal Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) on three separate public health issues: mental health/mental illness, Adverse Childhood Experiences, and Adolescent Sleep and School Start Times.  Dr. Lincoln has developed and conducted trainings on diversity and inclusion, issues related to work environment, organization and change management, team building, conflict resolution, and stress identification and reduction thereby enhancing employee performance and relationship management.  Dr. Lincoln has been adjunct professor in psychology doctoral and master’s programs at Chestnut Hill College, and Widener and Arcadia Universities and undergraduate at Temple University.  She is the co-author of the chapter, “Biracial Populations” in Clinical Practice with People of Color: A Guide to Becoming Culturally Competent, published in 2007.

Description of presentation: This workshop will focus on diverse veterans of war and other trauma survivors and how they utilize their faith and spirituality to enhance resiliency and recovery from traumatic events.  Some research indicates that specific veteran populations are more likely to utilize spiritual coping for recovery and support.  Conversely, these veterans are also less likely to seek behavioral health treatment for symptom relief.  Discussion will also focus on inclusion of discussion of spirituality within the clinical hour.

Educational Objectives:

  1. Discuss utilization of mental health and spiritual counseling in the veteran population
  2. Understand the differences between racial and ethnic groups for utilization of religion and spirituality coping
  3. Describe the positive impact that religion and spirituality have on mental health and resiliency within diverse veteran populations

Target Audience: Doctoral Level Psychologists, Mental Health & Health Professionals, Social Workers, and Counselors

Level of Instruction: Intermediate

CEU:  1 credit

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Trauma-Focused CBT and Latino Youth: A Developing Perspective

Arturo Zinny, MA, LPC (2012)

Trauma Learning Community

Biographical Sketch: Arturo Zinny, MA, LPC (2012) is currently Clinical Coordinator of Mental Health and Drug and Alcohol Services at Congreso. Mr. Zinny is a graduate of the Universidad Nacional de Rosario in Rosario, Argentina where he received both is Bachelor and Master’s degrees in psychology.  He became a Licensed Psychologist in Argentina in February 2004 (National University of Rosario, Argentina) and remained there for 3 years working as a Psychologist. The last 6 years of his professional experiences have been in the United States.

For the past nine years, he has been working with children and adolescents who have experienced multiple interpersonal traumas in clinical, educational, and community settings both in Argentina and the United States.  Before his current position, Mr. Zinny served in various capacities such as Mental Health Therapist for a Teen Pregnancy Prevention Program, Family Therapist and a host of other clinical positions in a myriad of health settings.

Description of presentation: Latinos are the fastest-growing ethnic group in the United States, yet their mental health needs are often underserved. This presentation discusses the impact of trauma in the mental health of inner city Latino children and adolescents and highlights the implementation of Trauma-Focused Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (TF-CBT) and its challenges when working with the Latino population. Trauma-Focused CBT is used to help people suffering from clinical post-traumatic stress and their return to a normal state of functioning after a traumatic event. This therapy, when serving the Latino population, is used for the caretakers, children, and adolescents in a way that decreases the negative behavior patterns and emotional responses that occur as a result of sexual abuse, physical abuse, or other trauma.  Specific strategies will be offered throughout the presentation to empower psychologists and other health professionals on methods to better utilize TF-CBT in daily practice.

Educational Objectives:

  1. Identify how abuse, violence, poverty, and marginalization influence Latino youth development. 
  2. Describe TF-CBT interventions for helping Latino youth.
  3. Gain awareness of the challenges of implementing TF-CBT with Latino youth.

Target Audience: Doctoral Level Psychologists, Mental Health & Health Professionals, Social Workers, and Counselors

Level of Instruction: Intermediate

CEU: 1 Credit

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Cross-Cultural Considerations for Mental Health Assessments
Delane Casiano, MD

Biographical Sketch: Delane Casiano, MD is an instructor at the Penn Center for Women’s Behavioral Wellness (PCWBW) in the Department of Psychiatry at the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania.

She is an adult psychiatrist with an interest in health disparities and health services research. She is a current recipient of a National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH) Research Supplement to Promote Diversity in Health-Related Research. With this award, she serves as a sub-investigator of a study on tailored depression treatments for older adults in primary care and principal investigator of her own study on cultural influences on mental health care decision-making among depressed older adults. She is a past postdoctoral participant in the Program for Minority Research Training in Psychiatry (PMRTP) fellowship award, an NIMH-funded research fellowship program administered by the American Psychiatric Institute on Research and Education (APIRE). 

She received her bachelor’s of arts degree from Brown University, graduating with honors in Health and Society with a focus in maternal and child health. She completed her medical training at Morehouse School of Medicine, a historically Black medical school whose mission is to serve underserved populations. She then completed psychiatry residency at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania. During residency, she was also a two-year recipient of the American Psychiatric Association (APA) Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) fellowship program which is administered by the APA Minority Fellowship Program. 

In terms of her clinical activities, she currently provides pharmacotherapy and individual psychotherapy to women across the reproductive life cycle as a staff psychiatrist at the Penn Center for Women’s Behavioral Wellness (PCWBW).  She is also the Director of The Maternal Wellness Initiative which is a collaborative partnership between PCWBW, the Helen O. Dickens Center, and the Philadelphia Department of Behavioral Wellness that was created to develop an integrated mental health-obstetrics/gynecology clinical and training program at the Helen O. Dickens Center.

In addition to her research and clinical activities, one of her primary teaching activities is to serve as the director of the Cultural Psychiatry Course for psychiatry residents at the University of Pennsylvania. She also provides local and national lectures to mental health professionals and community organizations. 

Description of presentation: Consideration of culture is important in the evaluation of mental disorders among all patients and may be particularly key when treating patients of color in order to provide services that are evidenced-based and culturally appropriate. Cultural factors for diagnosis and treatment of mental disorders among diverse populations will be presented.  A broad overview of the historical context of cultural approaches to mental health assessments in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM) will be reviewed. Clinical applications will also be discussed through use of case examples.

Educational Objectives:

  1. List the basic elements of the DSM-IV-TR Outline for Cultural Formulation
  2. Describe the purpose of the DSM-5 Gender and Cross-Cultural Study Group
  3. Examine an example of practical applications of cross-cultural considerations for mental health assessments

Target Audience: Doctoral Level Psychologists, Mental Health & Health Professionals, Social Workers, and Counselors

Level of Instruction: Beginner

CEU: 1 Credit

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Dueling Identities and Double Jeopardy: My Culture vs. My Life
Javier Dominguez, DPM, MS

Biographical Sketch: Javier Dominguez, DPM, MS, born in Caguas, Puerto Rico (where he completed middle and high school) and raised in rural Adams County, Pennsylvania completed his undergraduate education at the University of Puerto Rico in Cayey where he majored in Natural Sciences.  After graduation and at the urging of his family, Dr. Dominguez moved to Philadelphia to attend Pennsylvania College of Podiatric Medicine where he earned a Doctorate in Podiatric Medicine.  He completed a one year rotating podiatric medical residency in Neumann Medical Center in Philadelphia. He practiced podiatric medicine for 2.5 years in Camden, New Jersey. 

Even though he enjoyed clinical practice, he decided to pursue his passion - education. For the next 2 years he worked full-time as a teacher with an emergency teaching certificate with part-time jobs on the weekends to put himself through graduate school at Drexel University where he earned a Masters in the Science of Instruction K-6 with a minor in middle school science.  He received Pennsylvania Level II Certification in Elementary Education K-6 and Middle School Science 6-8. After nine years of teaching, he started the Masters Integrated Science Education Program at the University of Pennsylvania and received full scholarship by the National Science Foundation.  After three years of hard work and sacrifice, Dr. Dominguez received his degree in Masters of Integrated Science Education this past December.  Dr. Dominguez has been teaching in the School District of Philadelphia for twelve years and has been involved in the education of children from 3rd – 8th grades. He also has worked for Turning Points for Children to help parents become more empowered and to make better decisions and become better parents.

Dr. Dominguez credits his passion for children through the love of his parents. His parents were heavily involved in the Catholic Church and were instrumental in starting the first Latino church in rural Pennsylvania.  

Description of presentation: Culture is more than a feeling and an emotion.  It is the very fabric by which everyone lives his/her life.  What happens when a person’s culture inhibits his/her development? This presentation will highlight the personal and professional struggles of one man’s journey through his culture in order to uncover his true abilities to bring about healing and education to others.  From prejudicial encounters early in life to family ostracism over career aspirations, Dr. Dominguez has constantly fought to find himself.  As a Puerto Rican man with a “secret identity” that was juxtaposed to traditional cultural values and Catholicism, Dr. Dominguez dueled with how to create a satisfying professional life. The presenter, through self-disclosure, will explain how professionals should interact with clients and patient who present dissimilar viewpoints surrounding culture, alternative lifestyles, and HIV.

Educational Objectives:

  1. Participants will be able to identify Puerto Rican cultural values and understand the significance of these values when working with children or adults
  2. Participants will learn how dueling diversities impact personal and professional decision making
  3. Participants will learn how to approach sensitive issues with persons who present multiple cultural diversities
  4. Participants will explore options regarding self-disclosure

Target Audience: Doctoral Level Psychologists, Mental Health & Health Professionals, Social Workers, and Counselors

Level of Instruction: Beginner

CEU: 1 Credit

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Clyde’s Daughter: A Journey through Stigmatization and Serious Mental Illness in the African American Family
DeBorah Gilbert White, PhD

American Psychological Association
Society for the Psychological Studies of Social Issues
Association of Black Psychologist
Delaware Valley Association of Black Psychologists (Chair – Professional Affairs Committee)

Biographical Sketch: DeBorah Gilbert White, PhD serves as Associate Faculty with the University of Phoenix where she facilitates online courses on cultural diversity and teaches psychology courses in the campus setting. Dr. Gilbert White is president of DGW Consulting, where she provides workshop facilitation, strategic planning, and research services to institutions, organizations, and groups related to issues of diversity.

Dr. Gilbert White served as the Associate for Cultural Proficiency with the national offices of the Presbyterian Church (USA) in Louisville, KY.  In that capacity she assisted the denomination with its efforts toward creating a climate for transformative change and inclusivity.  Prior to this position, she served as the Minister for Anti-Racism and Conflict Resolution with the United Church of Christ national offices in Cleveland, OH.

Dr. Gilbert White is a social psychologist and lead researcher for the Hidden Crisis Project, a research study focused on the health and well-being of heterosexual monogamous African American women who are involved or have been involved with men engaged in down low sexual activities. 

Dr. Gilbert White holds a BA in communication, an MA in psychology (Diversity Specialization Management Program) from Cleveland State University, and a PhD in psychology from Union Institute and University.  She is a member of the American Psychological Association, Society for the Psychological Study of Social Issues, and the Association of Black Psychologists.

Description of presentation: Living with a mental illness is not easy. However, when you are an African American with a mental illness life is twice as challenging. Research has supported that African Americans (and Latinos) are less inclined to seek professional assistance for mental disorders and disturbances. Moreover, if medical intervention is offered many ethnic groups are likely to use psychopharmacological intervention without consideration for psychotherapy. The stigma that mental illness has within the African American community can be crippling. This workshop examines attitudes and behaviors connected to serious mental illness and the effect on African-American familial relationships. Beliefs, stereotypes, and efforts toward eliminating social stigma are explored.

Educational Objectives:

  1. Participants will understand the role of culture in addressing serious mental illness
  2. Participants will gain knowledge of how serious mental illness can affect families from a personal perspective
  3. Participants will have an opportunity for intrapersonal reflections on issues connected to persons living with serious mental illness in their home, place of worship, and community

Target Audience: Doctoral Level Psychologists, Mental Health Professionals, Social Workers, and Counselors

Level of Instruction: Beginner

CEU: 1 Credit 

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A Deaf School Psychologist Signs Out: Reflections/Insights on 30 Years of Working in the Trenches of Deaf Education
Michael Ralph, MA, CAGS, NCSP

National Association of School Psychologists (NASP)
Maine Association of School Psychologists (MASP)
Association of School Psychologists of Pennsylvania (ASPP)

Biographical Sketch: Michael P. Ralph is a graduate of Gallaudet University with an Educational Specialist Degree in School Psychology. He has worked at four schools for the deaf throughout his career. Currently, Mr. Ralph is serving his 1st full year as a School Psychologist at the Pennsylvania School for the Deaf (PSD) in Philadelphia, PA. Mr. Ralph arrived at PSD in January, 2011 after working 7+ years at the Maine Educational Center for the Deaf and Hard of Hearing (MECDHH) and the Governor Baxter School for the Deaf located on Mackworth Island in Falmouth, Maine. He is a native Philadelphian and grew up in Ridley Park and attended Archbishop Ryan Memorial Institution for the Deaf in the Spring Garden section of Philadelphia, later transferring to the Ridley School District in Folsom, PA. Additional professional experiences for Mr. Ralph include being a teacher assistant at the Summit School in Wallingford, PA before attending Gallaudet University in Washington, DC. This is the only liberal arts college in the world for deaf students.

Mr. Ralph is a deaf professional fluent in American Sign Language (ASL) with over 30 years of experience performing psychological evaluations with deaf and hard of hearing children.  He has been a Nationally Certified School Psychologist since 1989. He is especially skilled at administrating psychological test instruments to children with significantly delayed language and limited communication skills, to children with special needs. Because of his fluency in ASL, he is able to conduct testing in the child's native language, which, in most cases, is ASL. Mr. Ralph is very experienced in determining which tests would be appropriate/not appropriate to administer based on pertinent factors including language and cultural issues.

Description of presentation: The role of a psychologist in any particular school system is rewarding, yet challenging when faced with different situations. The challenges may become magnified based upon exceptionalities less discussed in higher learning institutions. This presentation will reflect and highlight over 30 years of experiences working with deaf and hard of hearing children. Throughout the presentation many topics directly and indirectly related to working as a school psychologist such as American Sign Language (ASL), deaf history/deaf community/deaf culture, cochlear implants, communication modalities, assessment issues, deaf/HOH children and their families will be explored. Additionally, stories and video clips will further enhance participants' understanding of working with this sensitive population.

Educational Objectives:

  1. Participants will be able to explain the differences between deaf, hard of hearing, signing/sign language and other forms of communication used within the deaf community
  2. Participants will learn about the challenges facing deaf children in the educational system and how advocates can advance the cause for appropriate assessment for deaf children
  3. Participants will learn about what assessment measures are used in determining eligibility for special education services
  4. Participants may indirectly learn ASL alphabet and ASL signs throughout the presentation

Target Audience: Doctoral Level Psychologists, Mental Health & Health Professionals, Social Workers, and Counselors

Level of Instruction: Intermediate

CEU: 1 credit

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Intimate Partner Violence Intervention through the Lens of Culture
Caroline Campbell, LSW & Zujeil Flores, BA

Biographical Sketch: Caroline Campbell is a licensed social worker who currently oversees the Women’s Wellness Department at Congreso de Latinos Unidos, Inc.. In this role, she oversees all domestic violence counseling services for the adult and youth program. Prior to her role as Manager, Caroline oversaw the Conexiones Youth Health Empowerment program, served as the Clinical Coordinator of the Alcanza Cares Project, a federally funded demonstration project focused on improving life outcomes for teen parents and supported the Health Promotion and Wellness Division at Congreso through strategic initiatives. Her background includes providing direct clinical services, research, and work with community based and international organizations.

She has taught as an adjunct professor at Temple University School of Health Sciences since 2007. Her most recent publication in the Journal of Interpersonal Violence (2010) is entitled “Intimate Partner Violence among Pregnant and Parenting Latina Adolescents.”  She currently serves as a Board Member with Maternity Care Coalition in Philadelphia. In addition to this experience Ms. Campbell has volunteered throughout Central America, and spent a year teaching in Ecuador through the Fulbright ET Program. She received her Masters in Social Work from Temple University, and her Bachelors in Psychology from Millersville University. Her interests are in trauma and resiliency in Latino communities, the impact of culture on mental health and wellness, and secondary trauma in helping professionals.

Zujeil Flores is the Counseling Coordinator of the Latina Domestic Violence Program at Congreso de Latinos Unidos, Inc. in North Philadelphia. She is responsible for the coordination of the adult services including individual empowerment and options counseling, support group, Domestic Violence Hotline and Medical Advocacy. She serves on the advisory board for the Latina Domestic Violence Program and has served in different committees and collaboratives in Philadelphia including the Domestic Violence and Law Enforcement Committee, the Multidisciplinary Team for the Department of Human Services and the LGBTQ and Domestic Violence collaborative. She was born and raised in Mexico and moved to Chicago at the age of 17 to attend college. She received her BA in Psychology from Northeastern Illinois University.  During the past 7 years she has worked with families and individuals in different settings including Early Childhood Education, Child Protection Services, and Domestic Violence services. Her current research interests are violence prevention, and communities/environments that foster collaboration and non-violence as buffers for the effects of generational violence and trauma. 

Description of presentation: This interactive workshop will provide an in-depth understanding of intimate partner violence, and its impact on health outcomes across the life cycle.  Exploration of the dynamics of intimate partner relationships within different cultural communities, and the unique challenges for intervention will be discussed. Lastly, practical strategies for harnessing the strengths and resiliency imbedded in different cultural communities in order to increase safety for violence impacted people will be considered.

Educational Objectives:

  1. Identify and be able to screen for intimate partner violence, understanding the unique barriers and strengths that are present for different cultural communities when dealing with relationship violence.
  2. Increase awareness of community resources available to support survivors and their families in domestic violence situations.
  3. Become knowledgeable about options for intervention in domestic violence situations
    through providing education, support and advocacy and identify ways to incorporate screening and safety planning into their practice

Target Audience: Doctoral Level Psychologists, Mental Health & Health Professionals, Social Workers, and Counselors

Level of Instruction: Intermediate

CEU:  2

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Standing Up and Speaking Out Against Hate Crimes
Cliff Akiyama, MA, MPH, CGS, CGP

Biographical Sketch: Mr. Akiyama is an Assistant Professor of Forensic Medicine and Assistant Director of the Forensic Medicine Program in the Department of Pathology, Microbiology, Immunology, and Forensic Medicine at PCOM.  Mr. Akiyama received his BA in Philosophy from the University of Virginia and received both his MA in Criminology with Distinction and MPH (Public Health) from the University of Pennsylvania.  He is a Certified Gang Specialist by the Virginia Gang Investigators Association and a Certified Gang Professional by the East Coast Gang Investigators Association.  Additionally, Mr. Akiyama has over 16 years of experience working with youth gangs as a researcher, academician, and law enforcement officer.  He was recently appointed by Philadelphia’s Mayor Michael Nutter to serve as one of twenty-five Commissioners on the Mayor’s Commission on Asian American Affairs. His main area of research is investigating youth gang violence and hate crimes from a multidisciplinary approach.

Description of presentation: It has been 29 years since the tragic death of Vincent Chin, a 27 year old Chinese American man, who was brutally beaten to death in Detroit, Michigan on June 19, 1982.  Although the crime was racially motivated, it was not recognized as a hate crime and Vincent Chin’s murderers were only sentenced to three years probation and a monetary fine of $3,000.

Unfortunately, hate crimes and bias incidents are still occurring in our communities today.  In 2010 there were 7,690 total hate crime incidents reported to the FBI nationwide.  Of those, 48.4% were racially motivated, 19.1% were motivated by sexual orientation, 18.3% were based on religious bias, and 13.5% were prompted by ethnic/national origin bias.  Hate crimes are often described as acts that affect not just the individual targeted, but the entire community to which the individual belongs. 

The purpose of this workshop is to educate the participants not only about the statistics of hate crimes, but what hate crimes and bias incidents are.  Furthermore, we will learn what sets hate crimes apart from other violent crimes, while exploring different types of hate groups and their motivations.  Most importantly, this presentation will provide resources and steps to take if one has become a victim of or witnesses a hate crime or bias incident on a college campus, hospital, or in the community.

Educational Objectives:

  1. Participants will learn how to identify signs of a hate crime and what differentiates a hate crime from other violent crimes
  2. Participants will be able to distinguish the difference between a hate crime and bias incident and what motivates each one
  3. Participants will learn the barriers to getting help
  4. Participants will learn the steps to reporting hate crimes/bias incidents

Target Audience: Doctoral Level Psychologists, Mental Health & Health Professionals, Social Workers, and Counselors

Level of Instruction: Intermediate

CEU: 2 Credits

 
 

Last Updated: 10/13/14